Minesto Tidal Kite

Imagine that you are standing on a beach, flying a kite in the wind. You feel the strong lift force from the kite in the rope as the wind tries to carry the kite away. As you move the kite sideways, you notice that it flies fast – way faster than the wind is blowing.

If you would attach a turbine to the kite and put it in the ocean, where a water current flows instead of the wind blowing, you would have the concept of Deep Green, Minesto’s patented and awarded ocean energy power plant.

Expanding the ocean energy potential

What makes Deep Green different from other tidal energy technologies is the wing, the size of the turbine and the fact that the power plant is “flying” under water. The wing pushes the turbine through the water in an eight-shaped trajectory, sweeping a large area at a relative speed that is several times the actual speed of the underwater current.

The speed has a cubic relationship to the power production. This means that when Deep Green multiplies the relative speed which the turbine is pushed through the water, the electricity produced by the power plant's generator is several hundred times greater compared to if the turbine would be stationary.

By adding this step of energy conversion, Minesto expands the global ocean energy potential.

How it works

Minesto’s marine energy technology, called Deep Green, generates electricity from low-flow tidal streams and ocean currents by a unique and patented principle similar to a stunt kite flying in the wind.

The wing uses the hydrodynamic lift force created by the underwater current to move the kite. With onboard control system and rudders, the kite is autonomously steered in a pre-determined figure of eight, pushing the turbine through the water. By doing so, the turbine experiences a water flow several times higher than the actual stream speed.

The turbine diffuse power to the generator which outputs electricity via power cable in the tether. Seabed umbilical transfers the electricity to the onshore connection.

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